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In Greek mythology, the name Clymene or Klymene (/ˈklɪmɪniː, ˈklaɪ-/;[1][2] Ancient Greek: Κλυμένη, Kluménē) may refer to:

Clymene, one of the 3,000 Oceanids, water-nymph daughters of the Titans Oceanus and his sister-spouse Tethys.[3][4] She was the wife of the Titan Iapetus, and mother of Atlas, Epimetheus, Prometheus, and Menoetius;[5] other authors relate the same of her sister Asia.[6] A less common genealogy makes Clymene the mother of Deucalion by Prometheus.[7] The Oceanid Clymene was also given as the wife to King Merops of Ethiopia and, by Helios, mother of Phaëton and the Heliades.[8] She may also be the Clymene referred to as the mother of Mnemosyne by Zeus.[9] In some myths, Clymene was one of the nymphs in the train of Cyrene.[10]
Clymene, name of one or two Nereid(s),[11] 50 sea-nymph daughters of the 'Old Man of the Sea' Nereus and the Oceanid Doris.[12] Clymene and her other sisters appeared to Thetis when she cries out in sympathy for the grief of Achilles for his slain friend Patroclus.[13]
Clymene, an Amazon.[14]
Clymene, an "ox-eyed" servant of Helen.[15] She was a daughter of Aethra[16] by Hippalces,[17] thus half-sister to Theseus and a distant relative to Menelaus.[18] Clymene and her mother were taken by Helen to Troy as handmaidens when the daughter of Tyndareus was carried off by Paris.[19] Later on, she was among the captives during the Trojan War along with Aethra, Creusa, Aristomache and Xenodice.[20] After the taking of Troy, when the booty was distributed, Clymene was given to Acamas. Meanwhile, some accounts relate that she and her mother were released by Acamas and Demophon after the fall of Troy.[21]
Clymene, a Cretan princess as the daughter of King Catreus, son of Minos. She and her sister Aerope were given to Nauplius to be sold away, as Catreus feared the possibility of being killed by one of his children. Nauplius took Clymene to wife, and by him she became mother of Palamedes, Oeax and Nausimedon.[22]
Clymene, an Orchomenian princess as the daughter of King Minyas. She was the wife of either Cephalus[23] or Phylacus,[24] and mother of Iphiclus and Alcimede.[25] Some sources call her Periclymene[26] or Eteoclymene,[27] while according to others, Periclymene and Eteoclymene were the names of her sisters.[28] Alternately, this Clymene was the wife of Iasus and mother by him of Atalanta.[29] She was one of the souls encountered by Odysseus in his journey to the underworld.[30]
Clymene, wife of Merops of Miletus, and mother of Pandareus.[31]
Clymene, possible mother of Myrtilus by Hermes.[32]
Clymene, a nymph, mother of Tlesimenes by Parthenopaeus.[33]
Clymene and her husband Dictys were honored in Athens as the saviors of Perseus and had an altar dedicated to them.[34]

Legacy

356217 Clymene, Jupiter trojan (asteroid), named after the daughter of Catreus, wife of Nauplius and mother of Palamedes.[35]
104 Klymene, Themistian asteroid

Notes

Russell, William F. (1989). Classic myths to read aloud. New York: Three Rivers Press. ISBN 9780307774439.
Barchers, Suzanne I. (2001). From Atalanta to Zeus : readers theatre from Greek mythology. Englewood, Colo.: Teacher Ideas Press. p. 192. ISBN 9781563088155.
Hesiod, Theogony 351
Kerényi, Carl (1951). The Gods of the Greeks. London: Thames and Hudson. p. 41.
Hesiod, Theogony 508; Hyginus, Fabulae Preface; Scholiast on Pindar, Olympian Odes 9.68
Apollodorus, 1.2.3
Dionysius of Halicarnassus, Antiquitates Romanae 1.17.3; Scholia on Pindar, Olympian Ode 9.81; on Homer, Odyssey 10.2
Ovid, Metamorphoses 1.756 & 4.204; Strabo, Geographica 1.2.27 citing Euripides; Servius, Commentary on Virgil's Aeneid 10; Eustathius on Homer, p. 1689
Hyginus, Fabulae Preface
Virgil, Georgics 4.345
Virgil, Georgics 4.345; Hyginus, Fabulae Preface
Homer, Iliad 18.47
Homer, Iliad 18.39-51
Hyginus, Fabulae 163
Homer, Iliad 3.144
Dictys Cretensis, Trojan War Chronicle 5.13
Scholia on Homer, Iliad 3.144
Dictys Cretensis, Trojan War Chronicle 1.5: Atreus, the father of Menelaus, and Pittheus, the father of Aethra, were brothers.
Ovid, Heroides 17.267
Pausanias, Graeciae Descriptio 10.26.1 with reference to Stesichorus, The Sack of Troy
Dictys Cretensis, Trojan War Chronicle 6.2
Apollodorus, 3.2.2; Epitome 6.8; also 2.1.5 for Nausimedon
Pausanias, Graeciae Descriptio 10.29.6
Scholia on Apollonius Rhodius, Argonautica 1.45; on Odyssey 11.326
Apollonius Rhodius, Argonautica 1.45 - 47 & 233
Hyginus, Fabulae 14
Stesichorus, fr. 45
Scholia on Apollonius Rhodius, Argonautica 1.230
Apollodorus, 3.9.2
Homer, Odyssey 11.325
Pausanias, Graeciae Descriptio 10.30.2; Antoninus Liberalis, Metamorphoses 36
Scholia on Apollonius Rhodius, Argonautica 1.752
Hyginus, Fabulae 71
Pausanias, Graeciae Descriptio 2.18.1

"356217 Clymene (2009 SA101)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 6 February 2018.

References

Aken, Dr. A.R.A. van. (1961). Elseviers Mythologische Encyclopedie. Amsterdam: Elsevier.
Apollodorus, The Library with an English Translation by Sir James George Frazer, F.B.A., F.R.S. in 2 Volumes, Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1921. ISBN 0-674-99135-4. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library. Greek text available from the same website.
Apollonius Rhodius, Argonautica translated by Robert Cooper Seaton (1853-1915), R. C. Loeb Classical Library Volume 001. London, William Heinemann Ltd, 1912. Online version at the Topos Text Project.
Apollonius Rhodius, Argonautica. George W. Mooney. London. Longmans, Green. 1912. Greek text available at the Perseus Digital Library.
Bartelink, Dr. G.J.M. (1988). Prisma van de mythologie. Utrecht: Het Spectrum.
Dictys Cretensis, from The Trojan War. The Chronicles of Dictys of Crete and Dares the Phrygian translated by Richard McIlwaine Frazer, Jr. (1931-). Indiana University Press. 1966. Online version at the Topos Text Project.
Dionysus of Halicarnassus, Roman Antiquities. English translation by Earnest Cary in the Loeb Classical Library, 7 volumes. Harvard University Press, 1937-1950. Online version at Bill Thayer's Web Site
Dionysius of Halicarnassus, Antiquitatum Romanarum quae supersunt, Vol I-IV. . Karl Jacoby. In Aedibus B.G. Teubneri. Leipzig. 1885. Greek text available at the Perseus Digital Library.
Gaius Julius Hyginus, Fabulae from The Myths of Hyginus translated and edited by Mary Grant. University of Kansas Publications in Humanistic Studies. Online version at the Topos Text Project.
Hesiod, Theogony from The Homeric Hymns and Homerica with an English Translation by Hugh G. Evelyn-White, Cambridge, MA.,Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1914. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library. Greek text available from the same website.
Homer, The Iliad with an English Translation by A.T. Murray, Ph.D. in two volumes. Cambridge, MA., Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann, Ltd. 1924. ISBN 978-0674995796. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library.
Homer, Homeri Opera in five volumes. Oxford, Oxford University Press. 1920. ISBN 978-0198145318. Greek text available at the Perseus Digital Library.
Homer, The Odyssey with an English Translation by A.T. Murray, PH.D. in two volumes. Cambridge, MA., Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann, Ltd. 1919. ISBN 978-0674995611. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library. Greek text available from the same website.
Kerényi, Carl, The Gods of the Greeks, Thames and Hudson, London, 1951.
Maurus Servius Honoratus, In Vergilii carmina comentarii. Servii Grammatici qui feruntur in Vergilii carmina commentarii; recensuerunt Georgius Thilo et Hermannus Hagen. Georgius Thilo. Leipzig. B. G. Teubner. 1881. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library.
Pausanias, Description of Greece with an English Translation by W.H.S. Jones, Litt.D., and H.A. Ormerod, M.A., in 4 Volumes. Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1918. ISBN 0-674-99328-4. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library
Pausanias, Graeciae Descriptio. 3 vols. Leipzig, Teubner. 1903. Greek text available at the Perseus Digital Library.
Publius Ovidius Naso, The Epistles of Ovid. London. J. Nunn, Great-Queen-Street; R. Priestly, 143, High-Holborn; R. Lea, Greek-Street, Soho; and J. Rodwell, New-Bond-Street. 1813. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library.
Publius Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses translated by Brookes More (1859-1942). Boston, Cornhill Publishing Co. 1922. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library.
Publius Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses. Hugo Magnus. Gotha (Germany). Friedr. Andr. Perthes. 1892. Latin text available at the Perseus Digital Library.
Publius Vergilius Maro, Bucolics, Aeneid, and Georgics of Vergil. J. B. Greenough. Boston. Ginn & Co. 1900. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library.
Strabo, The Geography of Strabo. Edition by H.L. Jones. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press; London: William Heinemann, Ltd. 1924. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library.
Strabo, Geographica edited by A. Meineke. Leipzig: Teubner. 1877. Greek text available at the Perseus Digital Library.

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