- Art Gallery -

Periphas (/ˈpɛrɪfəs/; Ancient Greek: Περίφᾱς,[1] Períphās "conspicuousness") in Greek mythology may refer to:

Periphas, a legendary king of Attica who Zeus turned into an eagle.
Periphas, one of the sons of Aegyptus. He married (and was killed by) Actaea, daughter of Danaus.[2]
Periphas, a son of Oeneus.[3]
Periphas, a son of Lapithes and Orsinome in Thessaly. He consorted with Astyagyia, daughter of Hypseus, and had by her eight sons, of whom the eldest, Antion was a possible father of Ixion with Perimela.[4]
Periphas, one of the Lapiths at the wedding of Pirithous and Hippodamia.[5] He must not be confused with the above-mentioned Periphas who was also a Lapith.
Periphas, same as Hyperphas.[6]
Periphas, son of the Aetolian Ochesius, fell by the hand of Ares in the Trojan war.[7]
Periphas, a companion of Neoptolemus who took part in the destruction of Troy.[8]
Periphas, one of the suitors of Penelope.[9]
Periphas, a son of Epytus, and a herald of Aeneas.[10]
Periphas, one of the five sons of Arrhetus who fought against Dionysus in the Indian War.[11]

Greek Mythology

Diomedes (with Pallas Athene) and Ares with Periphas

Notes

gen. Περίφαντος
Pseudo-Apollodorus, Bibliotheca 2.1.5
Antoninus Liberalis, Metamorphoses 2
Diodorus Siculus, Bibliotheca historica 4.69.2-3
Ovid, Metamorphoses 12.449
Scholia on Euripides, Phoenician Women, 63

Saying this, Athena grabbed Sthenelus' hand
and hauled him from the chariot to the ground.  
He jumped up at once. The goddess climbed up eagerly
beside lord Diomedes in the chariot.
The oaken axle groaned aloud, weighed down, 
bearing the fearful goddess and the finest man.
Pallas Athena took up the reins and whip.    
First, she led the sure-footed horses straight at Ares.
He was removing armour from huge Periphas,
Ochesius' fine son, by far the best of the Aetolians.
Blood-stained Ares was stripping him of all his weapons.
Then Athena put Hades' helmet on her head, 
so she would be invisible to mighty Ares.  
But man-killing Ares did see Diomedes.  
He let the body of huge Periphas lie there,  
where he'd first killed him and ripped out his spirit.
He strode directly to horse-taming Diomedes.

Homer, Iliad 5.842
Virgil, Aeneid 2.476
Pseudo-Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, Epitome of Book 4, 7.29
Homer, Iliad 17.323

Nonnus, Dionysiaca 26.257

References

Antoninus Liberalis, The Metamorphoses of Antoninus Liberalis translated by Francis Celoria (Routledge 1992). Online version at the Topos Text Project.
Diodorus Siculus, The Library of History translated by Charles Henry Oldfather. Twelve volumes. Loeb Classical Library. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press; London: William Heinemann, Ltd. 1989. Vol. 3. Books 4.59–8. Online version at Bill Thayer's Web Site
Diodorus Siculus, Bibliotheca Historica. Vol 1-2. Immanel Bekker. Ludwig Dindorf. Friedrich Vogel. in aedibus B. G. Teubneri. Leipzig. 1888–1890. Greek text available at the Perseus Digital Library.
Homer, The Iliad with an English Translation by A.T. Murray, Ph.D. in two volumes. Cambridge, MA., Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann, Ltd. 1924. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library.
Homer, Homeri Opera in five volumes. Oxford, Oxford University Press. 1920. Greek text available at the Perseus Digital Library.
Nonnus of Panopolis, Dionysiaca translated by William Henry Denham Rouse (1863-1950), from the Loeb Classical Library, Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press, 1940. Online version at the Topos Text Project.
Nonnus of Panopolis, Dionysiaca. 3 Vols. W.H.D. Rouse. Cambridge, MA., Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann, Ltd. 1940–1942. Greek text available at the Perseus Digital Library.
Pseudo-Apollodorus, The Library with an English Translation by Sir James George Frazer, F.B.A., F.R.S. in 2 Volumes, Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1921. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library. Greek text available from the same website.
Publius Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses translated by Brookes More (1859-1942). Boston, Cornhill Publishing Co. 1922. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library.
Publius Ovidius Naso, Metamorphoses. Hugo Magnus. Gotha (Germany). Friedr. Andr. Perthes. 1892. Latin text available at the Perseus Digital Library.
Publius Vergilius Maro, Aeneid. Theodore C. Williams. trans. Boston. Houghton Mifflin Co. 1910. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library.
Publius Vergilius Maro, Bucolics, Aeneid, and Georgics. J. B. Greenough. Boston. Ginn & Co. 1900. Latin text available at the Perseus Digital Library.

This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Smith, William, ed. (1870). Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology.

Greek Mythology

See also : Greek Mythology. Paintings, Drawings

Mythology Images

A - B - C - D - E - F - G - H - I - J - K - L - M -
N - O - P - Q - R - S - T - U - V - W - X - Y - Z

Α - Β - Γ - Δ - Ε - Ζ - Η - Θ - Ι - Κ - Λ - Μ -
Ν - Ξ - Ο - Π - Ρ - Σ - Τ - Υ - Φ - Χ - Ψ - Ω

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/"
All text is available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License

Ancient Greece

Science, Technology , Medicine , Warfare, , Biographies , Life , Cities/Places/Maps , Arts , Literature , Philosophy ,Olympics, Mythology , History , Images

Medieval Greece / Byzantine Empire

Science, Technology, Arts, , Warfare , Literature, Biographies, Icons, History

Modern Greece

Cities, Islands, Regions, Fauna/Flora ,Biographies , History , Warfare, Science/Technology, Literature, Music , Arts , Film/Actors , Sport , Fashion

---

Cyprus

Greek-Library - Scientific Library

Greece

World

Index

Hellenica World