- Art Gallery -

The Dark Matter Particle Explorer, or DAMPE (also known as Wukong), is a Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) satellite which launched on 17 December 2015.[4] The satellite was launched on a Long March 2D rocket from Launch Pad 603 at the LC-43 complex, also known as the South Launch Site, at the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center.[4] It is China's first ever space observatory.

DAMPE is a space telescope used for the detection of high energy gamma rays, electrons and cosmic ray ions, to aid in the search for dark matter.[4][6] It was designed to look for the indirect decay signal of a hypothetical dark matter candidate called weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs).[7]

The project is the result of a collaboration among research institutions and universities in Italy, Switzerland and China under the leadership of the Purple Mountain Observatory (PMO) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS).

Objectives

The scientific objectives of the mission are:[4]

the search and study of dark matter particles by conducting high-resolution observations of high-energy electrons and gamma rays.
the study of the origin of cosmic rays by observing high energy electrons and heavy nuclei in the TeV energy range.
the study of the propagation and acceleration mechanisms of cosmic rays through the observation of high-energy gamma rays.

Collaboration

The project is the result of a collaboration among research institutions and universities in Italy, Switzerland and China under the leadership of the Purple Mountain Observatory (PMO) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS).[8] The DAMPE mission is funded by the strategic priority science and technology projects in space science of CAS.[9][10][11] The institutes that have been part of the collaboration are: IHEP (Institute of High Energy Physics), CAS (Chinese Academy of Sciences), Beijing, China; IMP (Institute of Modern Physics), CAS (Chinese Academy of Sciences), Lanzhou, China; NSSC (National Space Science Center), CAS (Chinese Academy of Sciences), Beijing, China; PMO (Purple Mountain Observatory), CAS (Chinese Academy of Sciences), Nanjing, China; USTC (University of Science and Technology of China), Hefei, China; INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) and University of Perugia, Italy; INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) and University of Bari, Italy; INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) and University of Lecce, Italy; INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) and Gran Sasso Science Institute (GSSI), L'Aquila, Italy; DPNC (Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire), University of Geneva, Switzerland.

Results

The first scientific result of DAMPE came in November 2017 as the direct detection of a break in the cosmic electron plus positron energy spectrum at an energy of 0.9 TeV. [12] [13]

In October 2019, DAMPE released its measurement of the proton component of cosmic rays, confirming previous results while also hinting towards new features in the energy spectrum.[14]
Naming

The space observatory is nicknamed Wukong (Chinese: 悟空) after the Monkey King, who is the hero in the classic Chinese tale Journey to the West. Literally, "wu"(悟) means comprehension or understanding and "kong"(空)means void, so this name could also be understood as "understanding the void", relating to the undiscovered nature of dark matter.[1]

The English name, DAMPE, was a backronym, which was named after a non-player character (NPC) in The Legend of Zelda, Dampé (ダンペイ).[15] In the game, player need Dampé to find the treasure, which match with the mission of DAMPE (not finding dark matter, but finding the evidence that dark matter exist).

References

"China's new Monkey King set for journey into space". Xinhua. 16 December 2015. Retrieved 19 December 2015.
Li, Ye; Yuan, Qiang (29 August 2012). "Testing the 130 GeV gamma-ray line with high energy resolution detectors". Physics Letters B. 715 (1–3): 35–37. arXiv:1206.2241. Bibcode:2012PhLB..715...35L. doi:10.1016/j.physletb.2012.07.057. S2CID 59141316.
"DAMPE (Wukong)". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 18 December 2015.
Barbosa, Rui C. (16 December 2015). "Chinese Long March 2D lofts DAMPE – A Dark Matter Investigator". NASA Spaceflight. Retrieved 25 April 2016.
"CZ-2D (2) (Chang Zheng-2D (2))". Gunter's Space Page. Retrieved 18 December 2015.
Nowakowski, Tomasz (2 June 2015). "China to launch its first dark matter probe by the end of 2015". Spaceflight Insider. Retrieved 18 December 2015.
Normile, Dennis (29 November 2017). "China's dark matter space probe detects tantalizing signal". Science. Retrieved 19 March 2018.
"DArk Matter Particle Explorer". Department of Nuclear and Corpuscular Physics, University of Geneva. Retrieved 26 October 2017.
"First finding of China's DAMPE may shed light on dark matter research". Phys.org. 30 November 2017. Retrieved 19 March 2018.
Dickinson, David (18 December 2015). "China Launches Dark Matter Probe". Sky & Telescope.
Shen, Zhongtao; Feng, Changqing; Gao, Shanshan; Zhang, Deliang; Jiang, Di; Liu, Shubin; An, Qi (2015). "Study on FPGA SEU Mitigation for the Readout Electronics of DAMPE BGO Calorimeter in Space". IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science. 62 (3): 1010. arXiv:1406.3928. Bibcode:2015ITNS...62.1010S. doi:10.1109/TNS.2015.2427293. S2CID 26666344.
Ambrosi, G.; An, Q.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Azzarello, P.; Bernardini, P.; Bertucci, B.; Cai, M. S.; Chang, J.; Chen, D. Y.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. L.; Chen, W.; Cui, M. Y.; Cui, T. S.; D'Amone, A.; De Benedittis, A.; De Mitri, I.; Di Santo, M.; Dong, J. N.; Dong, T. K.; Dong, Y. F.; Dong, Z. X.; Donvito, G.; Droz, D.; Duan, K. K.; Duan, J. L.; Duranti, M.; D'Urso, D.; Fan, R. R.; et al. (2017). "Direct detection of a break in the teraelectronvolt cosmic-ray spectrum of electrons and positrons". Nature. 552 (7683): 63–66. arXiv:1711.10981. Bibcode:2017Natur.552...63D. doi:10.1038/nature24475. PMID 29186110. S2CID 205261676.
"First finding of China's DAMPE may shed light on dark matter research".
An, Q.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Azzarello, P.; Bernardini, P.; Bi, X. J.; Cai, M. S.; Chang, J.; Chen, D. Y.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. L.; Chen, W.; Cui, M. Y.; Cui, T. S.; Dai, H. T.; d'Amone, A.; De Benedittis, A.; De Mitri, I.; Di Santo, M.; Ding, M.; Dong, T. K.; Dong, Y. F.; Dong, Z. X.; Donvito, G.; Droz, D.; Duan, J. L.; Duan, K. K.; d'Urso, D.; Fan, R. R.; Fan, Y. Z.; et al. (2019). "Measurement of the cosmic-ray proton spectrum from 40 GeV to 100 TeV with the DAMPE satellite". Science Advances. 5 (9): eaax3793. arXiv:1909.12860. Bibcode:2019SciA....5.3793A. doi:10.1126/sciadv.aax3793. PMC 6868675. PMID 31799401.

"悟空卫星英文名DAMPE竟源自《塞尔达传说》".

Spaceflight portal

vte

Dark matter
Forms of
dark matter

Baryonic dark matter Cold dark matter Hot dark matter Light dark matter Mixed dark matter Warm dark matter Self-interacting dark matter Scalar field dark matter Primordial black holes


Hypothetical particles

Axino Axion Dark photon Holeum LSP Minicharged particle Neutralino Sterile neutrino SIMP WIMP

Theories
and objects

Cuspy halo problem Dark fluid Dark galaxy Dark globular cluster Dark matter halo Dark radiation Dark star Dwarf galaxy problem Halo mass function Mass dimension one fermions Massive compact halo object Mirror matter Navarro–Frenk–White profile Scalar field dark matter

Search
experiments
Direct
detection

ADMX ANAIS ArDM CDEX CDMS CLEAN CoGeNT COSINE COUPP CRESST CUORE D3 DAMA/LIBRA DAMA/NaI DAMIC DarkSide DARWIN DEAP DM-Ice DMTPC DRIFT EDELWEISS EURECA KIMS LUX LZ MACRO MIMAC NAIAD NEWAGE NEWS-G PandaX PICASSO PICO ROSEBUD SABRE SIMPLE TREX-DM UKDMC WARP XENON XMASS ZEPLIN

Indirect
detection

AMS-02 ANTARES ATIC CALET CAST DAMPE Fermi HAWC HESS IceCube MAGIC MOA OGLE PAMELA VERITAS

Other projects

MultiDark PVLAS

Potential dark galaxies

HE0450-2958 HVC 127-41-330 Smith's Cloud VIRGOHI21

Related

Antimatter Dark energy Exotic matter Galaxy formation and evolution Illustris project Imaginary mass Negative mass UniverseMachine

vte

Space observatories
Operating

ACE (since 1997) AGILE (since 2007) AMS-02 (since 2011) Aoi (since 2018) Astrosat (since 2015) BRITE constellation (since 2013) CALET (since 2015) Chandra (AXAF) (since 1999) CHEOPS (since 2019) DAMPE (since 2015) DSCOVR (since 2015) Fermi (since 2008) Gaia (since 2013) HXMT (Insight) (since 2017) Hinode (Solar-B) (since 2006) HiRISE (since 2005) Hisaki (SPRINT-A) (since 2013) Hubble (since 1990) INTEGRAL (since 2002) IBEX (since 2008) IRIS (since 2013) ISS-CREAM (since 2017) Max Valier Sat (since 2017) MAXI (since 2009) Mikhailo Lomonosov (since 2016) Mini-EUSO (since 2019) NCLE (since 2018) NEOSSat (since 2013) NICER (since 2017) NuSTAR (since 2012) Odin (since 2001) SDO (since 2010) SOHO (since 1995) SOLAR (since 2008) Spektr-RG (since 2019) STEREO (since 2006) Swift (since 2004) TESS (since 2018) Wind (since 1994) WISE (since 2009) XMM-Newton (since 1999)

Planned

iWF-MAXI (2020) Astro-1 Telescope (2020) Nano-JASMINE (2020) ORBIS (2020) ILO-X (2021) IXPE (2021) James Webb Space Telescope (2021) XPoSat (2021) Euclid (2022) Space Solar Telescope (2022) SVOM (2022) XRISM (2022) K-EUSO (2023) Solar-C (2023) LORD (2024) JASMINE (2024) SPHEREx (2024) Xuntian (2024) Near-Earth Object Surveillance Mission (2025+) Spektr-UV (2025) Roman Space Telescope (2025+) PLATO (2026) LiteBIRD (2027) ARIEL (2028) Spektr-M (2030+) ATHENA (2031) LISA (2034)

Proposed

Arcus AstroSat-2 EXCEDE Fresnel Imager FOCAL HabEx Hayabusa2 Hibari Hypertelescope ILO-1 JEM-EUSO LUCI LUVOIR Lynx Nautilus Deep Space Observatory New Worlds Mission NRO donation to NASA OST PhoENiX Solar-D SPICA THEIA THESEUS

Retired

Akari (Astro-F) (2006–2011) ALEXIS (1993–2005) Alouette 1 (1962–1972) Ariel 1 (1962, 1964) Ariel 2 (1964) Ariel 3 (1967–1969) Ariel 4 (1971–1972) Ariel 5 (1974–1980) Ariel 6 (1979–1982) ASTERIA (2017–2019) ATM (1973–1974) ASCA (Astro-D) (1993–2000) Astro-1 (1990)
BBXRT HUT Astro-2 (HUT) (1995) Astron (1983–1989) ANS (1974–1976) BeppoSAX (1996–2003) CHIPSat (2003–2008) Compton (CGRO) (1991–2000) CoRoT (2006–2013) Cos-B (1975–1982) COBE (1989–1993) DXS (1993) EPOCh (2008) EPOXI (2010) Explorer 11 (1961) EXOSAT (1983–1986) EUVE (1992–2001) FUSE (1999–2007) Kvant-1 (1987–2001) GALEX (2003–2013) Gamma (1990–1992) Ginga (Astro-C) (1987–1991) Granat (1989–1998) Hakucho (CORSA-b) (1979–1985) HALCA (MUSES-B) (1997–2005) HEAO-1 (1977–1979) Herschel (2009–2013) Hinotori (Astro-A) (1981–1991) HEAO-2 (Einstein Obs.) (1978–1982) HEAO-3 (1979–1981) HETE-2 (2000–2008) Hipparcos (1989–1993) IUE (1978–1996) IRAS (1983) IRTS (1995–1996) ISO (1996–1998) IXAE (1996–2004) Kepler (2009–2018) Kristall (1990–2001) LEGRI (1997–2002) LISA Pathfinder (2015–2017) MOST (2003–2019) MSX (1996–1997) OAO-2 (1968–1973) OAO-3 (Copernicus) (1972–1981) Orbiting Solar Observatory
OSO 1 OSO B OSO 3 OSO 4 OSO 5 OSO 6 OSO 7 OSO 8 Orion 1 (1971) Orion 2 (1973) PAMELA (2006–2016) PicSat (2018) Planck (2009–2013) RELIKT-1 (1983–1984) R/HESSI (2002–2018) ROSAT (1990–1999) RXTE (1995–2012) SAMPEX (1992–2004) SAS-B (1972–1973) SAS-C (1975–1979) Solwind (1979–1985) Spektr-R (2011–2019) Spitzer (2003-2020) Suzaku (Astro-EII) (2005–2015) Taiyo (SRATS) (1975–1980) Tenma (Astro-B) (1983–1985) Uhuru (1970–1973) Vanguard 3 (1959) WMAP (2001–2010) Yokoh (Solar-A) (1991–2001)

Hibernating
(Mission completed)

SWAS (1998–2005) TRACE (1998–2010)

Lost

OAO-1 (1966) OAO-B (1970) CORSA (1976) OSO C (1965) ABRIXAS (1999) HETE-1 (1996) WIRE (1999) Astro-E (2000) Tsubame (2014–2015) Hitomi (Astro-H) (2016)

Cancelled

AOSO Astro-G Constellation-X Darwin Destiny EChO Eddington FAME FINESSE GEMS HOP IXO JDEM LOFT OSO J OSO K Sentinel SIM & SIMlite SNAP SPOrt TAUVEX TPF XEUS XIPE

See also

Great Observatories program List of space telescopes List of proposed space observatories List of X-ray space telescopes

Category Category:Space telescopes

vte

Chinese space program

China National Space Administration (CNSA)

Spaceports and landing sites

Jiuquan Taiyuan Wenchang Xichang Siziwang Banner (landing site)

Launch vehicles

Long March 2 Long March 3 Long March 4 Long March 5 Long March 6 Long March 7 Long March 11 Kuaizhou Kaituozhe

Exploration programs

Shuguang (cancelled) Shenzhou (human spaceflight) Chang'e (lunar exploration) Tiangong (space station)

Projects and missions
Science
Planetary science

Chang'e 1 (2007–09) Chang'e 2 (2010–present) Yinghuo 1† (2011) Chang'e 3 (2013–present) Chang'e 5-T1 (2014–present) Yutu (2013–2016) Chang'e 4 (2018-present) Yutu-2 (2018-present) Tianwen-1 (2020-present) Chang'e 5 (2020) ZhengHe (2024)

Astronomy and
cosmology

DAMPE (2015–present) HXMT (2017–present) GECAM (2020) SVOM (2021) EP (2021) ASO-S (2022) Xuntian (2022) Space Solar Telescope

Earth observation

CSES (2018–present) Double Star (2003–07) Gaofen (2013–present) HY TanSat (2016–present) Yaogan (2006–present) Ziyuan (CBERS) (1999–present) SMILE (2023)

Human spaceflight
Crewed expeditions

List of Chinese astronauts Shenzhou 5 Shenzhou 6 Shenzhou 7 Shenzhou 9 Shenzhou 10 Shenzhou 11 Shenzhou 12

Space laboratories and cargos

Tiangong 1 (2011–2018) Tiangong 2 (2016–2019) Tianzhou 1 (2017)

Chinese space station

Tianhe (2021) Wentian (2021) Mengtian (2022)

Navigation

BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS)

Telecommunications

Apstar (1994–present) Chinasat (1994–present) Tianlian I (2008–present) Tianlian II (2019–present)

Technology
demonstrators

Chongfu Shiyong Shiyan Hangtian Qi (2020) FSW Program (1969–2006) QUESS (2016–present) Shijian (1971–present) XPNAV 1 (2016–present)

Future missions marked in italics, failed missions marked with † sign

vte

← 2014 · Orbital launches in 2015 · 2016 →
January
SpaceX CRS-5 (Flock-1d' × 2 · AESP-14) – MUOS-3 – SMAP · FIREBIRD II A, B · GRIFEX · ExoCube
February
IGS-Radar Spare – Inmarsat 5-F2 – Fajr – DSCOVR – Progress M-26M – Kosmos 2503 / Bars-M No. 1
March
ABS-3A · Eutelsat 115 West B – WADIS-2 – MMS – Ekspress AM7 – USA-260 / GPS IIF-9 – KOMPSat-3A – IGS-Optical 5 – Soyuz TMA-16M – Galileo FOC-3, FOC-4 – IRNSS-1D – BeiDou I1-S – Gonets-M 11, 12, 13 · Kosmos 2504
April
SpaceX CRS-6 (Arkyd-3R · AggieSat 4 · Bevo 2 · Flock-1e × 14) – Thor 7 · SICRAL-2 – TürkmenÄlem 52°E / MonacoSAT – Progress M-27M
May
Mexsat-1 – USA-261 / X-37 OTV-4 · LightSail-1 · USS Langley · BRICSat-P · ParkinsonSat · GEARRS-2 · AeroCube 8A, 8B · OptiCube 1, 2, 3 – DirecTV-15 · SKY México-1
June
Kosmos 2505 / Kobalt-M – Sentinel-2A – Kosmos 2506 / Persona No.3 – Gaofen 8 – SpaceX CRS-7 (Flock-1f × 8)
July
Progress M-28M – UK-DMC 3 × 3 · CBNT-1 · DeOrbitSail – USA-262 / GPS IIF-10 – Star One C4 · MSG-4 – Soyuz TMA-17M – USA-263 / WGS-7 – BeiDou M1-S, M2-S
August
HTV-5 / Kounotori 5 (SERPENS · S-CUBE · Flock-2b × 14 · AAUSAT 5 · GOMX 3) – Eutelsat 8 West B · Intelsat 34 – Yaogan 27 – GSAT-6 / INSAT-4E – Inmarsat 5-F3
September
Soyuz TMA-18M – MUOS-4 – Galileo FOC-5, FOC-6 – TJSSW-1 – Gaofen 9 – Ekspress AM8 – XY-2 · Tiantuo-3 · ZDPS 2A, 2B · Xiwang-2 × 6 · DCBB · LilacSat-2 · NUDT-Phone-Sat · Xingchen × 4 · NS-2 · Zijing × 2 – Kosmos 2507, 2508, 2509 / Strela-3M × 3 – Pujian-1 · Tianwang 1A, 1B, 1C – Astrosat · LAPAN-A2 · ExactView 9 · Lemur-2 × 4 – BeiDou I2-S – NBN-Co 1A · ARSAT-2
October
Progress M-29M – Mexsat-2 – Jilin-1 · Lingqiao A · Lingqiao B · LQSAT – USA-264 / NOSS Intruder × 2 / NROL-55 · AeroCube-5c, 7 · SNaP-3 × 3 · PropCube × 2 · SINOD-D × 2 · ARC-1 · BisonSat · AMSAT Fox-1 · LMRST-Sat – APStar-9 – Türksat 4B – Tianhui 1C – USA-265 / GPS IIF-11
November
Chinasat 2C – HiakaSat · EDSN × 8 · PrintSat · Argus · STACEM · Supernova-Beta – Yaogan 28 – Arabsat 6B · GSAT-15 – Kosmos 2510 / EKS-1 / Tundra-11L – LaoSat-1 – Telstar 12V – Yaogan 29
December
LISA Pathfinder – Kosmos 2511 / Kanopus-ST · Kosmos 2512 / KYuA-1 – Cygnus CRS OA-4 (Flock-2e × 12 · CADRE · MinXSS 1 · Nodes × 2 · STMSat 1 · SIMPL) – ChinaSat 1C – Elektro-L No.2 – Kosmos 2513 / Garpun-12L – Soyuz TMA-19M – TeLEOS-1 · VELOX-C1 · Kent Ridge 1 · VELOX 2 · Galassia · Athenoxat-1 – DAMPE – Galileo FOC-8, FOC-9 – Progress MS-01 – Orbcomm-2 × 11 – Ekspress-AMU1 – Gaofen 4
Launches are separated by dashes ( – ), payloads by dots ( · ), multiple names for the same satellite by slashes ( / ). Cubesats are smaller.
Crewed flights are bolded. Launch failures are in italics. Payloads deployed from other spacecraft are (enclosed in brackets).

Physics Encyclopedia

World

Index

Hellenica World - Scientific Library

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/"
All text is available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License