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Deucalion and Pyrrha , Metamorphoses Bk I: 367-415 , Solis. ..And at the bidding of Zeus he took up stones and threw them over his head, and the stones which Deucalion threw became men, and the stones which Pyrrha threw became women. Hence people were called metaphorically people * from laas, "a stone." And Deucalion had children by Pyrrha, first Hellen, whose father some say was Zeus, and second Amphictyon, who reigned over Attica after Cranaus; and third a daughter Protogenia, who became the mother of Aethlius by Zeus. Apollodorus, Library and Epitome 1.7.2 * (gr. laos)

In Greek mythology, Pyrrha ( Πύρρα ) was the daughter of Epimetheus and Pandora and wife of Deucalion.

When Zeus decided to end the Golden Age with the great deluge, Deucalion and his wife, Pyrrha, were the only survivors. Prometheus told his son, Deucalion, to build an ark and, thus, they survived. During the flood, they landed on Mount Parnassus, the only place spared by the flood.

Once the deluge was over and the couple were on land again, Deucalion consulted an oracle of Themis about how to repopulate the earth. He was told to throw the bones of his mother behind his shoulder. Deucalion and Pyrrha understood the "mother" to be Gaia, the mother of all living things, and the "bones" to be rocks. They threw the rocks behind their shoulders, which soon began to lose their hardness and change form. Their mass grew greater, and the beginnings of human form emerged. The parts that were soft and moist became skin, the veins of the rock became people's veins, and the hardest parts of the rocks became bones. The stones thrown by Pyrrha became women; Those thrown by Deucalion became men.

Deucalion and Pyrrha had at least one son, Hellen, and possibly a second, Amphictyon (who is autochthonous in other traditions).

Deluge, Virgil Solis (Click to enlarge)

Pyrrha and Deucalion


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