- Art Gallery -

 

.

Seven against Thebes, The Oath, Adrastus, Polynices, Capaneus, Parthenopeus , Amphiaraus, Hippomedon, Tydeus , based on Flaxman

In Greek mythology, Amphiaraos or Amphiaraus ( Αμφιάραος)("doubly-cursed") was the son of Oicles and husband of Eriphyle. Amphiaraus was the King of Argos along with Adrastus, brother of Eriphyle, and Iphis.

Amphiaraus, 450 BC

Eriphyle persuaded Amphiaraus to take part in the Seven Against Thebes raid, though he knew he would die. She had been persuaded by Polynices, who offered her the necklace of Harmonia, daughter of Aphrodite. Amphiaraus reluctantly agreed to join the battle and asked his sons, Alcmaeon and Amphilochus to avenge his death. In the battle, Amphiaraus sought to flee from Poriclymenus, the son of Poseidon, who wanted to kill him, but Zeus threw his thunder and the earth opened to swallow Amphiaraus together with his chariot.

Farewell of Amphiaraus

Alcmaeon killed his mother when Amphiaraus died. He was pursued by the Erinyes as he fled across Greece, eventually landing the court of King Phegeus, who gave him his daughter in marriage. Exhausted, Alcmaeon asked an oracle how to avoid the Erinyes and was told that he needed to stop where the sun was not shining when he killed his mother. That was the mouth of the river Achelous which had been silted up. The god of that river, also named Achelous, gave him his daughter, Callirhoe in marriage if Alcmaeon would retrieve the necklace and clothes which Eriphyle wore when she persuaded Amphiaraus to take part in the battle. Alcmaeon had given these jewels to Phegeus who had his sons kill Alcmaeon when he discovered Alcmaeon's plan.

During the battle, Amphiaraus killed Melanippus.

Votive relief of Archinos (370 BC) from Tyrea, Argolis (Oropos / Amphiaraus), 0.49 m x 0.55 m. 3369 : Amphiaraos, Votive relief in the shape of a temple. Pentelic marble.

National Archaeological Museum, Athens, Greece

In Oropos, Northwest of Attica, Amphiaraus was worshipped as with a hero cult. He was considered a healing and fortune-telling god and was associated with Asclepius. The healing and fortune-telling aspect of Amphiaraus came from him ancestry: he was related to the great seer Melampus. After making a sacrifice of a few coins, or sometimes a ram, at the temple, a petitioner slept inside and received a dream detailing the solution to his/her problem.

Roman tradition speaks of a son of Amphiaraus named Catillus who escaped from the slaughter at Thebes and led an expedition to Italy where he founded a colony where eventually appeared the city of Tibur (now Tivoli), named after his eldest son Tiburtus.



Greek Mythology


See also : Greek Mythology. Paintings, Drawings

Mythology Images

Ancient Greece
Medieval Greece / Byzantine Empire
Science, Technology, Arts, , Warfare , Literature, Biographies, Icons, History
Modern Greece

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org"
All text is available under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License

Greeks

Greece

World

Index

Hellenica World