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Administrative Region : Central Macedonia
Regional unit : Kilkis

Eidomeni (Ειδομένη ) Kilkis

Eidomeni is a village in Greece near the border with FYROM Administratively, after the administrative reform of the "Kallikratis" program, it belongs to the Municipality of Paionia of the Regional Unit of Kilkis, while previously it belonged to the Kapodistrian Municipality of Axioupolis. The village is interwoven with the railway station, which is the first railway station that the traveler encounters entering Greece from European countries. The inhabitants of Eidomeni are a mixture of Macedonian native and descendant refugees who settled in 1922 from Eastern Thrace and the coasts of Asia Minor. According to the 2011 census, Eidomeni has a population of 154.

Location

The village is built at an altitude of 65 meters, on the outskirts of Kouri hill. It is located on the west bank of the river Axios and near the border with Northern Macedonia.

Historical data

The oldest name of the village was "Sehovo" or "Seovo", which was replaced by the existing one in 1936, based on the homonymous ancient city, located on the west bank of Axios near the village. During the Greek Revolution of 1821, the Sehovites revolted against the Ottomans, led by Zafirios Stamatiadis, who later fought in Southern Greece. The result for Eidomeni, then part of Yusuf Mukhlis Pasha, son of Ismail Bey of Serres, was to accept the Ottoman retaliation after the suppression of the uprisings in Macedonia, and to be almost completely destroyed. Many residents were forced to leave the village, and since then the Hellenism of Sehovo has shrunk irreparably, as Bulgarian farmers have begun to settle in order to fill the gap in the tsifliki. [2] From 1860 the village became the target of Unitarians of the Lazarist Battalion based in Thessaloniki, and converted the inhabitants of Unia with the financial assistance of the Consulates of France and Austria. During the Macedonian Revolution of 1878, the Sehovites became active again, forming armed guerrilla corps under Dellios Kovatsis, Stogiannis (Stoiko) Stoidis and Nikolaos Stoidis. [4] In the same year, the Bulgarian Bishop of Uniel, Nilo Isvorov, entered Sekhovo and converted many to Unia. Later, when the Nile Isvorov was converted to the Bulgarian Exarchate, he was followed by many of his Uniate followers. [5] In 1883, the Bulgarians caused incidents demanding churches and schools. Nevertheless, the Greek school continued to operate. In 1898, Bulgarian komitatzides assassinated Athanasios Stoikos, [8] and in 1899 Papa Dellios, a village priest. At that time, the Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople was unsuccessfully asked to appoint a hierarchical commissioner in Gevgelija because the metropolis of Vodena, where the area belonged, could not control the situation. Due to the many incidents, the church in the village ceased to function, but in October 1903, it was reopened by the Greek community of Sehovo. At the beginning of 1904, Sekhovo remained one of the most important villages of Hellenism in the region, although its inhabitants had suffered greatly from the actions of the komitatzids. Great was the contribution of the Sehovites during the Macedonian Struggle with their main fighters Georgios Stamatiadis, his son Zafirios Stamatiadis Papazafiriou, his grandchildren Georgios Papazafiriou Stamatiadis and Grigorios Papazafiriou Stamatiadis, as well as Stylianos [14] [14 Kovatsis].

Transportation

Near Eidomeni, there is the homonymous railway station with routes from / to Thessaloniki, Belgrade and Central Europe.

Immigration

Since 2014, mainly Syrians, Iraqi and Afghan refugees and migrants, but also Moroccans, Pakistanis and other nationalities have started flocking to Eidomeni, in order to cross the border and enter Northern Macedonia. Because Northern Macedonia and further north Serbia are outside the Schengen Agreement, refugees prefer this route to Northern Europe, so that if they re-enter the European Union from Hungary, in case of their arrest, Hungary will be considered as the first country of entry and be repatriated there, and not in much more southern Greece. In 2015, the authorities of Northern Macedonia decided to keep their borders guarded by the army, in order to prevent the entry of refugees.

The closure of the border resulted in the creation of an informal refugee camp, where refugees who could not cross the border ended up with a number of settlers of up to 5,000, [15] and at times 10,000. [16] With the number of migrants and refugees reaching 15,000 in 2016 due to the closure of Macedonia's borders, the Eidomeni camp was the largest in Europe. The protests of refugees and migrants in the region resulted in the frequent closure of the railway line to Northern Macedonia, culminating on April 10, 2016, when there were incidents between migrants and the neighbor's police officers, resulting in the injury of 264 refugees.

At the end of May 2016, by government decision, the camp was evacuated, while the refugees were transferred to other structures and camps. [18] At the same time, there have been criticisms of this hasty action, which states that the refugees have been transferred to inappropriate structures. [19]

Population censuses
Census 1928 1940 1951 1961 1971 1981 1991 2001 2001 2011
Population 532 [20] 542 [20] 422 [20] 511 [20] 393 [20] 421 [20] 334 [20] 235 [1] 154 [1]

References

"Census of a Century". idomeni.gr. Notified. Retrieved August 23, 2016.
George Ch. Chionidis, lecture: The measures taken by the Turks against the Greek revolutionaries of 1821 in Macedonia (reprinted from Macedonian IAI issue 27), Thessaloniki 1971
Modern History of Macedonia 1830-1912, Konstantinos Ap. Vakalopoulos, Antoniou Stamouli Publications, Thessaloniki 2000, pp. 81, 82
Macedonian Mixed, The National Action of George and John Xanthos (Gevgelija) and Alexandros Zoumetikos (Monastery) during the Macedonian Struggle, Blood Peninsula Research Foundation, Konstantinos Apostolos Vakalopoulos
Konstantinos A. Vakalopoulos, Northern Hellenism during the early phase of the Macedonian struggle 1878-1894, Stamouli Publications, 2004, p. 91
Konstantinos A. Vakalopoulos, Northern Hellenism during the early phase of the Macedonian struggle 1878-1894, Stamouli Publications, 2004, p. 124
Konstantinos Apostolou Vakalopoulos, Ethnic Struggle in Macedonia (1894 - 1904), Macedonia on the Eve of the Macedonian Struggle, Herodotus, Thessaloniki, 1999, p. 54
Neoklis Kazazis, Hellenisme et la Macedoine, Paris, 1903, p. 80
Konstantinos Apostolou Vakalopoulos, Ethnic Struggle in Macedonia (1894 - 1904), Macedonia on the Eve of the Macedonian Struggle, Herodotus, Thessaloniki, 1999, pp. 142, 146
Konstantinos Apostolou Vakalopoulos, Ethnic Struggle in Macedonia (1894 - 1904), Macedonia on the Eve of the Macedonian Struggle, Herodotus, Thessaloniki, 1999, p. 151
Konstantinos Apostolou Vakalopoulos, Ethnic Struggle in Macedonia (1894 - 1904), Macedonia on the Eve of the Macedonian Struggle, Herodotus, Thessaloniki, 1999, p. 223
Konstantinos Apostolou Vakalopoulos, Ethnic Struggle in Macedonia (1894 - 1904), Macedonia on the Eve of the Macedonian Struggle, Herodotus, Thessaloniki, 1999, p. 241
Ioannis S. Koliopoulos (scientific curator), Invisible, Indigenous Macedonians, Society for Macedonian Studies, University Studio Press, Thessaloniki, 2008, pp. 92, 93, 94
Konstantinos Apostolou Vakalopoulos, The Armed Struggle in Macedonia 1904-1908, Herodotus Publications, Thessaloniki, 1999, p. 342
"News from the Deutsche-Welle agency, August 23, 2015, Help in the refugee drama, Diogenis Dimitrakopoulos". Archived from the original on 24 August 2015. Retrieved 23 August 2015.
First Issue, November 8, 2015, Two hundred buses are waiting at the border, 10,000 refugees trapped in Idomeni
Announcement: The largest camp in Europe, LiveLeak. March 7, 2016
Interactive, Pegasus. "The camp in Idomeni" emptied ". Daily. Archived from the original on July 14, 2018. Retrieved May 29, 2016.
"Guardian: Conditions" Not for Animals "at the Hosted Area". In.gr. Retrieved May 29, 2016.
Michael Stamatelatos - Fotini Vamba Stamatelatou, Geographical Dictionary of Greece, TA NEA, 2012, Volume I, p. 210.

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