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Frederick Judd Waugh


Paintings

At the Base of the Cliff

The Great Deep

Along the Coast

Breaking Waves

Rocky Coast and Sea

Southwesterly Gale St. Ives

The Knight of the Holy Grail

The Swiss Alps

Frederick Judd Waugh (September 13, 1861 in Bordentown, New Jersey – September 10, 1940) was an American artist, primarily known as a marine artist. During World War I, he designed ship camouflage for the U.S. Navy, under the direction of Everett L. Warner.

Background

Waugh was the son of a well-known Philadelphia portrait painter, Samuel Waugh. He studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts with Thomas Eakins, and at the Académie Julian in Paris, with Adolphe-William Bouguereau. After leaving Paris, he moved to England, residing on the island of Sark in the English Channel, where he made his living as a seascape painter (Havens 1969).

In 1908, Waugh returned to the U.S. and settled in Montclair Heights, New Jersey. He had no studio until art collector William T. Evans (a railroad financier and President of Mills Gibbs Corporation, a dry goods firm) offered him one in exchange for one painting a year. In later years, he lived on Bailey Island, Maine, and in Provincetown, Massachusetts. In 1914, he was a judge of the art exhibit on Monhegan Island, ME during he 1914 Ter-Cenetary celebration of the Vogage of Captain John Smith.


Camouflage Service

In 1918, Waugh was recommended to serve as a camouflage artist (or camoufleur) for the U.S. Navy, as a member of the Design Section of its marine camouflage unit (Behrens 2002, 2009). That section was located in Washington, D.C., and was headed by American painter Everett L. Warner (Warner 1919).

According to a biography of Waugh (Havens 1969), “Many large ships, including the Leviathan, were painted according to his designs. Though the enterprise was of course a team effort in which no man played a solo part, he had every reason to be proud of his record. Only one ship with his system of camouflage was lost during the war” (p. 154).


See also

Dazzle camouflage
Everett L. Warner
Harold Van Buskirk
The Rise of the Munes www.theriseofthemunes.com
Red Ribbon Trail www.redribbontrail.org

References

Behrens, Roy R. (2002), False Colors: Art, Design and Modern Camouflage. Dysart, Iowa: Bobolink Books, pp. 82–107. ISBN 0-9713244-0-9.
___ (2009), Camoupedia: A Compendium of Research on Art, Architecture and Camouflage. Dysart, Iowa: Bobolink Books, pp. 374–376. ISBN 978-0-9713244-6-6.
Havens, George R. (1969), Frederick J. Waugh: American Marine Painter. Orono ME; University of Maine Press.
New York Times (1940), “F.J. Waugh Is Dead; Marine Artist, 79” (September 11).
Warner, Everett L. (1919), “Fooling the Iron Fish: The Inside Story of Marine Camouflage” in Everybody’s Magazine (November), pp. 102–109.

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